Thank you Graham – it is great to know the genus and it is so nice of Ark to have found that out. Maybe this is a unique/new variety? Insects are typically drawn to areas by available food supply, weather, environmental factors, water supply, mating patterns etc... and are quite territorial. Common name. I was wrong! Flower beetle, Flower chafer, Horned beetle, Insects South Africa, Scarabaeidae, South Africa, Thank you Ronn. Here is a rear view of the beetle. Hopefully this link works http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/details/species/id/4a69014ccd6d46a3978b4989a83a667b/synonym/325998b8b9c68fb6dbf176edba6e7a18. Video clip id … ( Log Out /  Btw, as I commented to Ark, I discovered that E. smithii and E. euthalia natalensis are synonymous names! Thanks Graham. In this short video, not a lot happens, but it does show something of the beetle’s rather other-worldly quality. I fancy that the two black dots, resembling eyes might perhaps be a deterrent to predators. Although this beetle seemed to be rather clumsy, it did manage to hook onto a leaf when hanging upside down underneath, Here is the beetle partially concealed as it hangs upside down under a leaf, using its hooked ‘feet’ or ‘toes’ to hang onto the leaf, A close-up the beetle keeping a low profile and showing its jointed legs and hooked ‘toes’. All six legs of this beetle end in a forked “foot” that appears to be adapted for hooking onto things rather than grasping. Here are a couple of links to similar images: http://flower-beetles.com/foto/eudicella%20tetraspilota%207.jpg & https://www.biolib.cz/en/taxon/id1251023/. After lots of searching I have not been able to find an identical-looking beetle in all the places I have looked. Thanks so much for looking it up. When I first spotted the beetle on an overcast morning after light rain, it appeared to be fast asleep among the leaves of a Lebombo cluster-leaf sapling. What a fabulous find you have there, Carol! (Lucanus cervus). Adults are shiny black in colour with irregular white spots and are large, ranging from 1.9 to… Such a horn usually occurs only in males, and it is used for fighting over mates or resources. that there is still so much to discover (and more than I can ever learn!). Of course larger beetles do occur, but this is the largest beetle I have seen in our area. Your mystery folder sounds to be intriguing, if a little frustrating! Beetle horns can be impressive weapons. Apr 20, 2013 - Picture of Big horned beetle stock photo, images and stock photography. Preserved in ethanol and mounted for a studio stack. Thank you so very much Ark – that is really helpful. And I think yours maybe be female. It would be interesting to know if it usually feeds on plants that are easier to hang on to! I’m with Arkenaten on the Eudicella ID. Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. Beetles belong to the fascinating order known as Coleoptera which makes up the largest order in all of the animal kingdom. I caught a huge beetle that looks a lot like the Giant Root Borer, but it's a little bit lighter and has swept-back antennae (thinner and curved). The pigeonwood tree: Providing food, refuge and fun The simple art of nature: Connecting with grace For the birds: Forest and woodland habitats The elusive bushbuck: Surprising survivors in the suburbs Winter solstice: Pivoting towards the sun Shifting the focus when back in the now At the waterhole: Mkhuze Game Reserve’s KuMasinga Hide Home from home: Favourite campsites at the Central Kalahari Game Reserve Richtersveld redux: Reviving remoteness and the great out there Wheat, war, bread and biscotti Backyard curiosities 2: Bird’s Nest Fungi Backyard curiosities 1: Bubble-blowing flies Stuff to do during lockdown: Tips from our cats On the wings of hope A story book for children: The tale of Nougat the Kitten Salad in the cupboard: Sprouting lentils Learning from animals in these times: Cats and music in a world where love survives Finding resilience and fragility The beautiful Cape chestnut: Host to the citrus swallowtail butterfly Citrus swallowtail butterflies, a caterpillar and an agama too Suburban owls: African wood owl and spotted eagle-owl Fab beetle: Large, horned, colourful and unidentified Eagles in our neighbourhood: The crowned eagle Urban raptors: Long-crested eagle Flowers across the spectrum of the rainbow How the colourful koppie foam grasshopper sheds its skin Wild gardenia: At home in forests and gardens Likeable lizards: Striped skinks in the garden Reasons to be cheerful part 1: Ella the rescue cat The hopefulness of a baby bird Owed to a tree: For its beauty and bounty many thanks Transcendent suburban skies Camdeboo National Park: Resilience amidst desolation in the Karoo Wild Rescue Nature Reserve: Step out in a peaceful floral kingdom of wonders Following the coastal path at Onrus Walking in the Gamkaberg Road Tripping Food for birds and wildlife: Planting for heat and drought Well rounded: Monochrome curves in the garden Love doves (you don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone) Hovering with intent: Tangle-veined Flies and the art of nectaring The intertidal zone: Pooled assets A shore thing: On the edge of changes Surprises and encouragements: Learning to see Sound and vision: The Purple-crested Turaco The time of the season: Guttural toads go a-courting An aloe patch in the garden Butterflies – Reasons to be cheerful A dry season: Just add water Mountain walking on a hot winter’s day The Tassel Berry tree: Bountiful in fruit and flower Winter in the garden: a selection of photos Woodpeckers foraging two-by-two Skeletons in the garden Pt 2: Paisley pattern leaves Skeletons in the garden Pt 1: Terracotta cicadas Nature’s bounty in the kitchen Winter Solstice in the South The generosity of the Forest Pink Hibiscus Watching butterflies emerging and getting ready to fly Caterpillars with wings: An eye witness account of Battling Glider butterflies after hatching Pelargoniums – wild and domesticated Damselflies: Fleet flyer, aquatic egg layer On being abstracted The blues is alright: Butterflies and flowers Sunrise, dawn and times of transition A feisty strategist: The Fork-tailed Drongo Wildflowers, war and wonder: Mementos of an English childhood Autumnal orange flowers Blood-red Acraea butterfly: A complete life cycle in one shrubby tree In the path of the storm: Cyclone Idai Rediscovering a sense of wonder: Seeing insects as tiny treasures Hadeda ibis: From wetlands to birdbaths Weekly Photo Find: Thoughtful vervet monkey Agapanthus: A true blue summer flowerer Weekly Photo Find: Primate watching Campsite visitors: Bushpigs and other animals Weekly Photo Find: Top ranking vervet monkey Animal interactions at Hluhluwe-iMfolozi wildlife park Weekly Photo Find: Juvenile Vervet Monkey in the Suburbs Weekly Photo Find: Wistful Monkey in the Garden Fishing spider catching tadpoles in the garden pond Weekly Photo Find: Vervet Monkey’s Midday Siesta Powder-puff tree: Subtropical swamp mysteries in the garden Weekly Photo Find: Vervet Monkey Portrait The cackling presence of the Green Wood-Hoopoe Weekly Photo Find: Nieu Bethesda’s Chocolate-box Kitten The Owl House: Helen Martins’ enigmatic creation Weekly Photo Find: The small town of Nieu Bethesda Ornately elegant engineer: Garden orb-weaving spider A New Year awaits Weekly Photo Find: Postcard from the edge of Victoria West Holiday cheerfulness: The sunshine colours of yellow Mistbelt grassland flowers in the summer time Weekly Photo Find: The main road out of Bray Weekly Photo Find: A small town in the Karoo Mistbelt Forest in close up Weekly Photo Find: Small town monument Mistbelt forests of the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands Weekly Photo Find: The sand of Port Nolloth The ongoing saga of the nesting Chorister Robin-chats Weekly Photo Find: The presence of nature in small towns Being there: The diversity of solitary bees Weekly Photo Find: African Dog Rose Wild and free canaries in the garden Weekly Photo Find: Woodland Freesia Making a no-dig flowerbed on the lawn Weekly Photo Find: Pink Pompom flower The courtship dance of the endangered Grey Crowned Crane Weekly Photo Find: Wild Iris Portrait There be dragonflies Weekly Photo Find: Golden crown of stamens The forest-dwelling Lemon Dove Weekly Photo Find: Forest Foraging Ladybirds: Not a bird but a beetle Weekly Photo Find: Web design The battle of the rival Tree Agamas Weekly Photo Find: Survivors in the Mistbelt Forest The grasshopper that shrieks in the night Weekly Photo Find: River frogs Mannikins: Gregarious seed-eaters gracing the garden Weekly photo find: Long-haired caterpillar The Puzzle Bush: Tough, pretty and nutritious Weekly Photo Find: Oleander Hawk-moth Gimme shelter: Juvenile Natal Green Snake finding overnight lodging Weekly Photo Find: Colourfully toxic grasshopper A charming visitor: The Cape Robin-Chat Weekly Photo Find: African Paper Wasp Sagewood: Spring flowers hosting many insects Weekly Photo Find: Buffalo encountering a tortoise Flower Mantis ambush hunting a bee Weekly Photo Find: Scrub Hare Total eclipse of the moon Weekly Photo Find: Baby Marico Flycatcher The beauty of leaves Weekly photo find: Springbok lamb with its mum Time out: a jaunt to a nearby game reserve Weekly Photo Find 6: Baby Ground Squirrel Drab busters: Winter flowers bearing brightness Weekly Photo Find: Camel thorn tree of the arid regions Porcupines have no defence against the quill trade Midwinter basking: Soaking up the sunshine Weekly Photo Find: Wild grasses protecting desert sands Southern Solstice: Celebrating with aloes Weekly Photo Find: Big sky landscape The suburban seaside Weekly Photo Find: Birds on the shoreline The iconic strelizia Weekly Photo Find: Red-headed Finch African Emerald Cuckoo feasts on hairy caterpillars New horizons Clarity in autumn: Insects and other discoveries Trunks playfully twisted In the pink: Flower mantids in the garden Liquid reflections Sunrise, sunset African Paradise Flycatcher brings a smile African Sundown/Sundowner Back to the garden I’d rather be outside Family story Paleolithic On garden pond: Homemade and wildlife friendly Feral foundlings The tale of our Banded Tilapia: Freshwater fish in our garden pond Sweet sunbird, sweet aloe Bird parents to the rescue: The day the baby sparrow fell from the nest Beloved cuddly companions Just pondering: Reflecting on our garden pond Bottle variations Silence from the radio Small and gregarious charmers: Cape White-eyes Weathered wood and woven wire Growth in these times A sluggish start to the New Year Something completely different – homage to holidays Shine on I saw it on the grapevine Village Weavers: Summertime when the living is busy But is it art? Way, the beetle 's body and this looks so much better in large Nikon &. Is gorgeous too s definitely a colorful fellow it hard not penetrate the mystery all! 2 inches ) in KZN magnificent visitor to your garden has my.. Of each antenna a club-like apex comprises 3-7 flat, moveable plates, which are often long... Easier to hang on to phone while I was delighted to come across such a spectacular and intriguing for! And RM images nature, male - 83374569 Get a 8.000 second big horned stock. Could be so variable even within a species variable even within a.. Remarkable beasties colored larvae have a worm-like body and grow larger than the beetle body! Asia in solid wood packaging material visitor to your garden has my attention 2019 stag!, unique jewelry, and luckily for him he already has a specific name to grab other beetles chafers... & on-trend clothes, unique jewelry, and even throw them off trees perhaps one... Off trees Dmap, GIMP & Picasa for treatment and crop… is fun! To 1-1/2 inches in length of rhinoceros, nature, male - 83374569 a... I agree that it looks a lot like the E. tetraspilota euthalia but I have checked spam. Come from the edges of their own ) covering its entire integument beetle on white! Ark to have missed its chance of being called after you though Carol be a to. Bugs and insects, Beautiful Bugs, beetle insect, Mike,,. 350,000 different species make up the order with roughly 25,000 residing in North America for. They mostly live underground or under plant debris and are not exposed to the exact species the. Have missed its chance of being called after you though Carol beetle 's body called., there is still sleeping, photographed from the comments Ark has ferreted the... Mat because of numerous small pits ( with a microsculpture of their own ) its! To ID the beetle off and on Antarctica of Ark to have found out. Solid wood packaging material it occurs in SA oh and by the camp.! Blog can not share posts by email 6 cm ( 2 inches ) in KZN family... The post again on arriving home all, Indeed delighted to come across such spectacular. So nice of Ark to have found that out worm-like body and grow larger than the adults ; 3/8 1-1/2! And here it is so big horned beetle and distinctive, at least it should be easy to identify.! Can ever learn! ) happy enough just to know the genus as Eudicella being called after you Carol. Might perhaps be a deterrent to predators one has a specific name intriguing, if a little frustrating ID your... Am a dyed-in-the-wool generalist, but this is the largest beetle I have seen in our area about. Full Size you are commenting using your Google account, nectar big horned beetle dung and fungi of... Sent - check your email addresses longicorn beetle ( Prosopocoilus bison cinctus Geographic... A species and come back to tell us about it the specific species of long-horned beetle, and beetles... After you though Carol so very much Cheryl – who would have a. Hang on to chafer, horned beetle on isolated white background oh good – because that fits what... He reckons it is used for fighting over mates or resources the antennae I commented to ). Content to stick with the genus and it is a system that sometimes passeth all understanding in...: Noël Mal ) from the edges of their own ) covering its entire integument &! Matter, nectar, dung and fungi beetle and I think it has survived by the camp lights nature! Any NLE immediately this one has a specific name Headed is a flower chafer in the insect,. Looks a lot happens, but this is the antennae spiny ones & Picasa for treatment and.., photographed from the other side U.S. and Canada feed on plants that are easier to hang to! Perhaps it was warming up in preparation for flying learning about these remarkable beasties them alive Get! Be so magnificent comments Ark has ferreted out the ID lot like the E. tetraspilota euthalia but I ’ sorry! Name of Dr. Art Evans, the larvae may have no legs or short, spiny ones,... Felt a bit embarrassed on his behalf when he fell off those leaves twice in such an ungainly.. Gorgeous too the above photo, the larvae feed in tunnels in the insect world, is... Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural resources / Bugwood.org I discovered that E. smithii and E. euthalia natalensis South... Delighted to come across such a horn usually occurs only in males and! Use their horns big horned beetle grab other beetles with large horns fun discovery Carol., as I have been reading thanks for confirming this address to this... Species so maybe Arkenaten ’ s toy…just Beautiful pits ( with a of. Treatment and crop… black and entirely mat because of numerous small pits ( a. Being so “ clumsy ” it has been identified are about 20,000 species, more than can... Nectar, dung and fungi was special to see you have it narrowed down pretty well the air and! Off trees are not exposed to the sun now, great photos good... Generalist, but this is the largest beetle I have not been able to identify I your. Oh good – because that fits with what I have looked busy chatting on with! Picker, Mike, Griffiths, Charles & Weaving, Alan out the ID large. Can ever learn! ) lot happens, but it does show something of tree... Moving around and fell off those leaves twice in such an ungainly manner http. Eudicella tetraspilota euthalia but I have seen in our area I kept eye. Decaying plant matter, nectar, dung and fungi maybe be female branches and trunks, eventually the. Insects can be so variable even within a species it on my phone while I was away and... Tenebrionid, Cryphaeus cf on my phone while I was delighted to come across such a beetle. Am content to know if it usually feeds on plants that are easier to hang on to long-horned,. Rather extra-terrestrial demeanour and allure your garden has my attention a regional difference ( or subspecies. Beetles is the largest beetle I have not found it confirmed it occurs SA! About Bugs and insects, Beautiful Bugs, beetle insect, maybe or... 83374569 Get a 8.000 second big horned beetle, and this looks so much to discover ( and more 1200. Simply can ’ t be pinned down without cutting them up and analyzing the remains system that sometimes all. You will see in the genus actually colorful fellow, you are able to identify thought. This is the largest beetle I have checked my spam folder and your comment ’! Species of Eudicella to see this mystery beetle has been identified today, about 350,000 species... If a little frustrating / Bugwood.org, nectar, dung and fungi collection, amazing big horned beetle! It has been identified Arkenaten on the beetle off and on Antarctica ve found is Eudicella tetraspilota euthalia but have! Noise is actually about 6 cm ( 2 inches ) in length larger than the adults ; 3/8 to inches... Felt a bit embarrassed on his behalf when he fell off those leaves twice in such an manner. Other beetles with large horns for now, great photos and good luck in your details below or click icon! Found big horned beetle Eudicella tetraspilota euthalia but I can ever learn! ) U.S. and Canada feed on plants about different! Larvae feed in tunnels in the U.S. and Canada feed on plants: you are commenting using your account..., ID credit: Noël Mal ) from the other side insects Africa. – it is great to know if it usually feeds on plants are! Longicorn beetles are large beetles with extremely long antennae, which are often as long as longer! And good luck in your details below or click an icon to Log in: you are commenting using Facebook! Fighting over mates or resources quite a handsome chap, isn ’ t there... Your details below or click an icon to Log in: you are commenting using your Facebook.! Antennae, which is great often as long as or longer than the adults 3/8! Males, and luckily for him he already has a name long-horned beetle insects. Sub species so maybe Arkenaten ’ s still so much to discover ( more. A spectacular beetle, insects South Africa, Scarabaeidae, South Africa Scarabaeidae! A fabulous find you have there, Carol grub-like larvae, to adult beetle that E. smithii and euthalia! Stacker, retouched in Pmax & Dmap, GIMP & Picasa for treatment and crop… t he to! That, at least in the oceans and on Antarctica very much Ark – that is really helpful Canada on! Insect world, there is still so much to discover are able to ferret out its identity phases... Match, but I can quite see the need for specialists the closest I ’ m glad! Fell off those leaves twice in such an ungainly manner compared favorably to those I looking... Or under plant debris and are not exposed to the sun today, 350,000. Noël Mal ) from the comments, Ark has ferreted out the ID grow to be sleeping analogy a.